My review of Victoria Stead’s “Becoming Landowners” is on available open access

I’m happy to say that my review of Victoria Stead’s Becoming Landowners is on available, open access, on the Pacific Affairs website. The sum of the article is: Setting aside my personal fondness for Tori — who is one of the most intellectually alive people I know — I think I can say with impartiality that the book is very good. There were some drawbacks for me: I personally would have preferred that it focus just on PNG, just because I’m a PNG chauvinist. I also think some readers might miscrecognize Stead’s distinction between ‘custom’ and ‘modernity’ as romantic or exorcizing. But this is definitely not the case if you read the book carefully. The book has many more strengths than weaknesses, and I especially appreciated her willingness to point out how often Papua New Guineans get the short end of the stick when it comes to resource development and industry. There is a cynical strand in the PNG literature which she is fighting against — which I probably give in to too often! — and I am really glad that she keeps us honest in this account. Overall, it’s a good book and I hope UH publishes it in a less-expensive and more accessible form.

Review of of Joyce Appleby’s “Shores of Knowledge”

(Trying to keep track of my reading — so here is a quick review of my in-flight reading from #ASAO2018)

As with her previous books, Appleby’s history of European science seen from the angle of discovery and colonization is lucid and well-organized. It will be of interest to anyone who wants a broad and easy overview of the period from Columbus to Darwin, whether they are high school students or nonfiction buffs. The book works chronologically, walking through the biographies of the best-known thinkers from each period. Appleby expertly cherry-picks the literature to provide good summaries from well-respected sources. Although the focus is on European exploration, there are enough digressions into astronomy and chemistry to make this more than just an account geography and voyaging — although note that philology and religious studies are not covered. Overall, Appleby’s book went down easy and filled in several gaps in my knowledge. It made great in-flight reading. Those looking for an introduction to this topic, or something to string all the pieces together will enjoy this well-written volume, but people wanting to go deeper into the literature or already know something about it will be better served looking elsewhere.

Leviathans at the Gold Mine reviewed for the Journal of Pacific History by Shaun Gessler

I’ve been bad about listing things on this blog, but I did want to note another review of Leviathans, this one from the Journal of Pacific History. As someone with a background in historical anthropology — and who just attended the Pacific History conference! — I’m very pleased the journal reviewed my book. I’m also flattered that the reviewer like it. You can find the review on the JPH’s website.

First review of Leviathans is in

I’m happy to say that the first review of my book Leviathans at the Gold Mine has appeared and that is it positive. You can read the review here. The author of the review is David Eller — whose textbook I’ve used in my intro class before, but who I’ve never met. The most frequent adjectives he uses to describe me and the book are ‘ingenious’ ‘exciting’ and ‘fascinating’, although I’m most flattered by the idea that one of my chapters is “calm but ultimately searing”. I don’t think I planned to be ‘searing’ but… I’m glad that Eller found it so.

I’ve also been told that the book has been adopted for use in two classes, so I’m glad to see that someone is taking the time read it after all the time I put in to writing it. So… thanks to everyone for their continued (and positive) reception of the volume!

My review of Keir Martin’s book is out

My book review of Keir Martin’s book The Death of the Big Men and the Rise of the Big Shots is now available in the latest number of Anthropological Forum. I liked Keir’s book a lot and highly recommend it. It clearly establishes him as a major scholar in this area. But I was disappointed that he didn’t flesh out what he means by ‘The West’ and its culturally specific form of individualism more.

Go take a look. You’ll learn a lot about New Ireland, and a fair but about Manchester as well.

My review of Digital Anthropology has been published

If you are interested in digital anthropology, you may also be interested in my short book review of Daniel Miller and Heather Horst’s book Digital Anthropology. The review can be found here. I think the book will be useful for students, but I didn’t feel it pushed the field forward at all. Nor do I feel it met its goal of founding an entire new sub discipline of anthropology. But how often do books achieve goals like that? Overall its very useful for people trying to learn more about this area, I think.